Eran Yashiv, 14 July 2021

What are the gains for workers from moving from a poor economy to a rich one? This column examines this question using the case of Palestinian workers who could decide to either work in the (poorer) local economy or commute to work in (richer) Israel. It finds productivity gains experienced by the migrants are largely offset by the low returns for the job tasks offered to these migrants in the richer economy.

Ruben Durante, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 15 June 2016

Governments involved in conflict are often concerned with how their actions are perceived by the international community. This column uses evidence on the Israel-Palestine conflict and US news reporting between 2000 and 2011 to show how media considerations can impact military strategy. Israeli attacks are more likely to be carried out one day before the US news is expected to be dominated by important political or sport events. There is no evidence of a similar pattern to Palestinian attacks. The findings suggest that strategic behaviour could undermine the effectiveness of the mass media as a watchdog, and thus reduce citizens’ ability to keep public officials accountable. 

David Jaeger, Daniele Paserman, 10 June 2008

Economists have moved from general, game-theoretic descriptions of armed conflicts to detailed investigations of the short-run dynamics of violent conflict. This column describes recent research on the impact of Israeli violence on Palestinian violence and vice versa as well as the impact of violence on Palestinian public support for radical factions and the peace process.

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