Tilman Tacke, Anu Madgavkar, Hans‐Helmut Kotz, 30 April 2020

The first two decades of the 21st century saw job opportunities expand and prices for discretionary consumer goods drop. But these gains came at the cost of social contracts in many countries, where working arrangements became more fragile, wages stagnated, and the labour share of income fell. This column argues that the severe economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have revealed vulnerabilities in the social contract. When the immediate crisis is over, risk may need rebalancing towards an increasing role for institutions and mutualisation.

Jacques Bughin, Christopher Pissarides, 02 January 2019

Europe’s social contracts to protect their citizens from socioeconomic risks are based on an inclusive growth model characterised by a more egalitarian view of revenue generation and distribution. But this model is under strain, with various global trends placing upward pressure on inequality that could intensify. This column suggests that keeping the essence of Europe’s current inclusive growth model does not preclude it from adapting its current social contracts to protect its citizens, whatever the disruptions that lie ahead.

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