Sofia Amaral-Garcia, Mattia Nardotto, Carol Propper, Tommaso Valletti, 15 December 2020

The internet is fundamentally changing the relationship between healthcare suppliers and demanders, leading to concerns that social media will increase demand for unnecessary and unsafe products and reduce demand for appropriate treatments. This column looks at demand in the UK for caesarean section births, and finds that mothers with better, faster access to the internet are 2.5% more likely to have a C-section than mothers living in areas with worse internet access. This effect comes from an increase in elective C-sections, with no effect of the internet on the likelihood of having an emergency C-section.

Sergei Guriev, 29 November 2019

The mobile internet, promises to give us access to information anywhere, 24 hours a day. So how has it influenced trust in governments, politics, and politicians? Sergei Guriev tells Tim Phillips about how, all over the world, 3G has reduced trust in government and aided the rise of populism. 

Sergei Guriev, Nikita Melnikov, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 31 October 2019

Information and communication technology has no doubt had a positive economic impact globally, but its political bearing is less clear. This column shows that the proliferation of mobile technology reduces citizens’ confidence in their current governments, especially in places where news broadcasting is censored but the internet is not. Furthermore, by reducing the cost of reaching voters, the internet has also led to increased support for both left-wing and right-wing populist movements.

Ofer Malamud, Santiago Cueto, Julian Cristia, Diether W. Beuermann, 08 March 2019

Many governments and NGOs have invested substantial resources in expanding internet access to children in developing countries. This column reports on an experiment in Peru in which laptops and access to the internet were provided to schoolchildren. While those selected to receive a laptop did improve their digital skills, the results suggest that increased access to the internet at home did not improve academic achievement, cognitive or socio-emotional skills, which are arguably the more important outcomes of such interventions.

Events

CEPR Policy Research