Jennifer Castle, David Hendry, 04 June 2020

The UK’s 2008 Climate Change Act has led to a 34% fall in CO2 emissions by 2019, while real GDP per capita had risen by more than 10% following the crash into the ‘Great Recession’. Can the UK achieve its recent net-zero emissions target by 2050 while still growing? This column describes some speculative routes to such a decarbonised future.

Johannes Bollen, 13 March 2020

While the energy transition to decarbonise the EU’s economy fully by 2050 will be felt economically in all member states, the costs of decarbonising can be substantially lowered through maximising the production of hydrogen, which in turn can be used to generate electricity. This column uses a global climate-energy economic model to compare three energy production scenarios. It finds that wind energy plus gasification of biomass, natural gas, or coal with carbon capture storage can reduce the cost of achieving Europe’s 95% emissions-reduction goal by 40%. 

Mengjia Ren, Lee Branstetter, Brian Kovak, Daniel Armanios, Jiahai Yuan, 16 March 2019

Despite leading the world in clean energy investment in recent years, China continues to engage in massive expansion of coal power thanks to policies that effectively subsidise and (over)incentivise coal power investment. This column examines the effects of the 2014 devolution of authority from the central government to local governments on approvals for coal power projects. It finds that the approval rate for coal power projects is about three times higher when the approval authority is decentralised, and provinces with larger coal industries tend to approve more coal power.

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