Ataman Aksoy, Francis Ng, 30 July 2010

This column sketches the changing face of global agricultural trade over the last 20 years. It finds that developing countries have not been able to increase their export shares in agriculture in line with their manufacture shares. What little increase there has been is largely the result of expanding exports to other developing countries.

Jesus Felipe, Utsav Kumar, Arnelyn Abdon, 22 July 2010

This column introduces the Index of Opportunities – a ranking of countries by their capacity to undergo structural transformation and develop. It suggests countries at the bottom are in urgent need of implementing policies that lead to higher diversification and sophistication of exports.

Ejaz Ghani, Lakshmi Iyer, 23 March 2010

Is conflict a cause or a result of underdevelopment? This column presents research on South Asia – the second most violent region in the world. It argues that conflict is both a cause and an effect. To break out of the trap, policymakers need to reduce poverty while at the same time restraining conflict to enable the much needed economic growth.

Milan Brahmbhatt, Otaviano Canuto, 02 March 2010

How important are primary commodities for economic development? This column suggests that primary commodity prices are likely to ease over the next five years. Nevertheless, commodity revenues will remain high, raising challenges that, if not addressed, can harm long-run development. With good governance, however, such revenues can also be a valuable resource to help accelerate overall development.

Ejaz Ghani, 25 February 2010

Which is the best route to development: Manufacturing or services? This column argues that India’s example of a “services revolution” – rapid growth and poverty reduction led by services – provides inspiration for late-comers to development and challenges the conventional wisdom that industrialisation is the only rapid route to economic development.

Matthew Kahn, Siqi Zheng, 19 January 2010

China’s economic growth has profound environmental implications. This column estimates the household carbon emissions of China’s major cities. Even in China’s most polluting city, per household emissions are just one-fifth of those in San Diego, the greenest city in the US.

Jonathan Morduch, 18 December 2009

Jonathan Morduch of New York University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his new book, Portfolios of the Poor: How the World’s Poor Live on $2 a Day – co-authored with Daryl Collins, Stuart Rutherford and Orlanda Ruthven – which reports on the yearlong ‘financial diaries’ of villagers and slum dwellers in Bangladesh, India, and South Africa. The interview was recorded in New York in August 2009.

Partha Dasgupta, 27 November 2009

Sir Partha Dasgupta of the University of Cambridge talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about why some countries are rich and others are poor. He argues that trust is the fundamental building block of societies – without it, there can be no basis for cooperation, which in turn leads to progress and economic development. The interview was recorded in Bristol, where he was delivering the Royal Economic Society’s annual public lecture in November 2009.

L Alan Winters, 02 April 2009

The crisis, started by rich nations, is now harming developing nations. In this column, Alan Winters – one of the world’s leading trade and development economists and now chief economist of the UK’s Department for International Development – argues that Summit commitments show that development and developing countries are at the heart of G20 leaders’ vision for the twenty-first century.

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This 3 day conference at St Catherine's College, Oxford University hosts speakers from Oxford, LSE, UCL, World Bank brings together many of the new and emerging themes in the economics of welfare. Theory tracks focus on social choice and welfare, and other related aspects of welfare economic theory and public economics. Empirical/applied tracks focus on policy areas including health, development, social policy, environment, education, poverty reduction, non-monetary measures of economic progress etc. Papers on applied econometrics or experimental work relevant to welfare economic theory and assumptions about human behaviour also welcome.

Dani Rodrik, 28 January 2009

The global crisis is an opportunity for developing nations to project their interests in multilateral institutions, and gain influence in shaping economic globalisation. To make the best of this outcome, developing nations need a good sense of their interests and priorities, but also to recognize that having a greater say entails acceptance of greater responsibilities.

Alberto Alesina, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 15 September 2008

Research on a large new dataset suggests that regional segregation within a country is associated with worse government – even after controlling for reverse causality.

Benjamin Olken, 29 August 2008

Ben Olken of MIT talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research on bribery in the Indonesian trucking industry – and the lessons for policy efforts to reduce corruption. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

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CEPR and the Paris School of Economics are jointly organizing (with financial assistance from Agence Nationale pour la Recherche, ANR) a one and a half day workshop focusing on conflicts, globalization and development. The workshop will take place at the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne campus of the Paris School of Economics. Papers are being sought that focus on the following topics: · Causes and consequences of violent conflicts: civil wars, interstate wars, terrorism, rebellion... · Arms trade · International trade, capital flows and violent conflicts · Institutions and violent conflicts · Multilateral institutions and conflicts . Political versus economic causes of conflicts...

Hendrik van Dalen, Mieke Reuser, 07 July 2008

Development assistance targeting health overwhelmingly concentrates on HIV/AIDS. This column argues that that focus neglects critical demographic issues and degrades health infrastructure, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The prime rule for AIDS aid should be “First, do no harm”.

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The school intends to provide an intensive training course for Ph.D. students and young researchers who are working in the fields of international economics and development.

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EU Member States and the European Commission often assert that the EU's multiple trade preference schemes are a concrete manifestation of Europe's commitment to the development of poorer nations through trade. But what do we really know about the impact of these measures? Do they actually affect developing countries evenly? By how much? In this presentation Simon Evenett will provide a comprehensive yet accessible overview of the empirical findings concerning the operation of the EU's trade preference schemes. WIth a discussion grounded in the evidence base, he will assess if there is a gap between European aspirations and the outcomes on the ground. Implications will be drawn for European trade and development policies in general, including those initiatives associated with the Doha Round.

Axel Dreher, Dirk-Jan Koch, Peter Nunnenkamp, Rainer Thiele, 20 May 2008

How do NGOs spend their development assistance? This column discusses research showing that NGO aid is no better targeted to the neediest countries than state aid agencies either by choosing needier countries, or by entering un-chartered waters and trying to excel where state aid is most likely to fail.

Thierry Mayer, 21 April 2008

Finding explanations for cross-country differences in development levels is perhaps one of the most important questions in economics. CEPR DP6798 provides evidence that access to markets, measured as a theory-based index of market potential is an important factor in development.

Branko Milanovic, Peter Lindert, Jeffrey Williamson, 05 December 2007

Is inequality largely the result of the Industrial Revolution? Or were ancient incomes as unequal as they are today in poor pre-industrial societies? Looking at pre-industrial inequality from the Roman Empire in 14 AD to British India in 1947 generates new insights into the inequality and economic development connection over the very long run.

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