Video Vox

Michael Burda 23 August 2018

Professor Michael C. Burda of the Humboldt University of Berlin discusses the German opinion on Britain's decision to leave the EU. 

Hélène Rey 13 August 2018

Hélène Rey, Professor of Economics at London Business School and CEPR Fellow, explains how credit booms develop, what their mechanics are and how the financial intermediaries involved take on different amounts of risk.

Martina Jasova 10 August 2018

Financial institutions rely on borrowing at short maturities, but when credit markets panic, banks are unable to roll over their short-term debt. Martina Jasova discusses how the ECB’s Very Long-Term Refinancing Operations revived lending in the euro area following the financial crisis, which in turn allowed firms to invest and hire more. The video was recorded at CEPR's Third Annual Spring Symposium.

Mariassunta Giannetti 02 August 2018

Some economists argue that corruption can contribute to economic growth by bypassing red tape and financing issues. Using data from China's anti-corruption campaign in 2012, Mariassunta Gianetti shows that small, young - and potentially more productive - firms tend to perform better when corruption is cut. This video was recorded at CEPR's Third Annual Spring Symposium.

Richard Disney 30 July 2018

It is commonly assumed that policing in Britain cannot keep up with rising crime levels. Richard Disney shows that, while some police forces in the country do better than others, in recent years the average performance of police forces has not changed. He also discusses key challenges British police face today, from the nature of crimes they must tackle to their labour demand.

Enrique Schroth 26 July 2018

Private equity funds are usually illiquid for invested limited partners over a fixed period of time. But, as the Global Crisis has shown, sometimes partners may need to cash out early. Enrique Schroth discusses how the cost of doing so, in terms of the discount partners pay on their investment, can be substantial. One quarter to one third of the variation in the discount paid for an early exit can be attributed to the amount of liquidity in the economy.

Mark Koyama 23 July 2018

Some research suggests violence towards minority groups is exacerbated during times of economic stress. Mark Koyama discusses his work on when the tendency to target minority groups becomes manifest. Using 1000 years' date on pogroms across Europe, he shows that the likelihood of scapegoating minority groups increased by 50% in seasons when harvests were likely to be poor.

Josephine Duh, Dean Spears 16 July 2018

Although average wealth in India has risen in recent years, calorie consumption has paradoxically fallen. Josephine Duh and Dean Spears explain that Indians are eating less despite being richer because disease rates are slowly declining, meaning that nutrition from food is extracted more efficiently.

Dong Lou 19 July 2018

Superstar firms like Facebook and Tesla make a substantial difference to overall industry productivity. In his research, Dong Lou asks whether they also impact students’ choices of degree majors. Using data on students' college major choices and the stock returns and media coverage of relevant companies in the US, he shows that firm performance had a positive effect on encouraging students to choose relevant majors. But the relevant labour demand in those industries has not risen accordingly, which has depressed wages.

Dirk Jenter 12 July 2018

The ways in which the size and nature of a company's board of directors affects its performance are complex. Using a dataset of German firms, Dirk Jenter shows that profitability and stock market valuations decrease as board sizes increase. Ill-designed board size regulations can therefore negatively impact a firm's performance.

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