VoxEU & CEPR Coverage of the Covid-19 Global Pandemic

Miltos Makris, Flavio Toxvaerd, 24 November 2020

The prospect of an effective vaccine to Covid-19 in the near term makes it important to understand private and public incentives to suppress infection. This column examines how the prospect of a vaccine alters individuals’ incentives to self-protect between now and the arrival of the vaccine, and how a benevolent social planner would prefer individuals to self-protect. It finds that individuals tend to ramp up self-protection in anticipation of the vaccine, while the social planner manages the transition by introducing stricter suppression at early stages.

Alex Bryson, Lorenzo Corsini, Irene Martelli, 24 November 2020

Public spending on education in Italy has been falling for many years, limiting the hiring of new permanent teachers and thus raising the average age of teachers in the country. This column considers the effect of allocating permanent teacher contracts to older teachers on student performance in upper-secondary schools in Tuscany. The findings suggest that a higher proportion of older teachers in a school has a negative effect on student performance. The government may need to do more to recruit younger cohorts of teachers into permanent posts, preferably through periodic intakes.

Claudia Hupkau, Barbara Petrongolo, 23 November 2020

A growing body of research is making clear the unequal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic across gender. This column explores what the likely implications of a second lockdown in the UK are for gender equality at work and in the home. While previous school closures in the first lockdown may have led to positive changes in the organisation of the home in terms of men and women sharing childcare responsibilities, women nevertheless are disproportionately affected by this lockdown, experiencing greater job loss rates and taking on more of the responsibilities at home.

Robert Schlögl, Christoph Schmidt, 23 November 2020

With its increasing ambition, the conceptual deficiencies of the European climate policy are becoming even more transparent – especially its neglect of the systemic nature of the energy system. This column highlights three key elements of a more promising approach to European climate policy: (i) establishing a uniform carbon price as its central policy element, (ii) ending the confusion of objectives and instruments, and (iii) dropping its naiveté about the repercussions of its own actions on global climate protection. Addressing these issues will be crucial to making the European Green Deal work effectively.

Thilo Albers, Morten Jerven, Marvin Suesse, 22 November 2020

Why do large differences in tax revenues between states exist and persist? This column introduces a comprehensive new dataset of tax and revenue collection for all African polities from 1900 to 2015 to answer this central question. The results confirm the importance of democratic institutions and political stability, while de-emphasising the role of resource revenues. Overall, states in Africa have been able to build institutions for the collection of ‘hard’ taxes when the preconditions were favourable, especially when access to external finance was limited. These insights add important nuance to established theories of state-building in developing countries.

Other Recent Columns:

Vox Talks

Events

CEPR Policy Research