Video Vox

Beatrice Weder di Mauro 12 October 2021

Governments will need to impose more carbon taxes, but central banks need to deliver price stability. So what is the effect of these taxes on inflation and economic activity? New research examines three decades of data from Canada and Europe.
 

Read more about the research discussed and download the free discussion paper:

Patrick Bolton 05 October 2021

Do financial markets penalise firms that emit a lot of carbon, and is this an incentive for them to reduce emissions? Patrick Bolton of Columbia Business School has analysed the financial returns to estimate how carbon risk is priced.

Christian Gollier, Maureen Cropper 27 September 2021

The Fourth CEPR/EAERE Webinar on Climate Policy takes place on 30 September 2021. The subject is carbon pricing, and to preview the session Maureen Cropper of the University of Maryland and Christian Gollier Toulouse School of Economics and RPN director talk to Tim Phillips about the issues for economists – and how COP26 can help. Register for the webinar: cepr.online/carbonpricing.

Jean Pisani-Ferry 21 September 2021

Questions over the way that Europe is constructed economically have never been more important or urgent. Jean Pisani-Ferry of Sciences Po tells Tim Phillips what issues the CEPR research policy network dedicated to Europe’s Economic Architecture will be focusing on, and how it can influence discussions among policymakers.

Dirk Niepelt 07 September 2021

The research policy network on Fintech and Digital Currencies has an ever-expanding list of issues for its researchers. Dirk Niepelt of the University of Bern, RPN director, explains what's top of the agenda for central banks and policymakers, and how the RPN can influence their decisions.

Anna Bindler, Pia Pinger 31 August 2021

Anna Bindler and Pia Pinger of the University of Cologne and CEPR talk about the inaugural CEPR Women in Economics Workshop in Micro & Applied Microeconomics, a collaboration between CEPR and the University of Cologne, with the support of the ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy Cluster of Excellence. With keynote lectures given by Anna Aizer (Brown University) and Randi Hjalmarsson (University of Gothenburg and CEPR) along with further 14 contributed papers being presented, this workshop offers a wide spectrum of presentations on the topics of crime, adverse behaviours, inequality and equal opportunities.

The organising committee is inviting those interested in these topics to explore the programme and sign-up for the workshop taking place online on 9 – 10 September 2021 by visiting https://cepr.org/100048/programme.

Alex Edmans 24 August 2021

Alex Edmans of the London Business School and CEPR, author of Grow the Pie, argues there doesn't have to be a trade-off between growing value for investors and for society. But what does this mean in practice, and how strong is the evidence?

Dirk Schoenmaker 17 August 2021

The CEPR recently launched its research policy network on sustainable finance. Dirk Schoenmaker of the Rotterdam School of Management is leading the RPN, and Tim Phillips asks him what “sustainable” finance is, how the RPN will involve bankers as well as academics, and how big an effect it can have on policy choices.

Glenn Rudebusch 09 August 2021

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has just published its sixth report, warning of “unprecedented” effects and “irreversible” damage. For more than a year, the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco has been running its Virtual Seminar on Climate Economics to help economists estimate, model, and propose policies to mitigate the extent of the crisis. Glenn Rudebusch of the FRBSF tells Tim Phillips that “the economics profession as a whole has been slow to grapple with climate change”, and so the seminars are bringing fresh, interdisciplinary research to a wider audience.

Max Mosley 03 August 2021

Is the welfare state a drain on resources, or should policymakers reframe it as a targeted way to deliver fiscal stimulus in a crisis? Max Mosley argues that evidence from the UK’s targeted welfare payments shows there is a large multiplier effect when we target credit-constrained families.

You can read the paper discussed, The Importance of Being Earners: Modelling the Implications of Changes to Welfare Contributions on Macroeconomic Recovery by Max A. Mosley, in issue 82 of CEPR's Covid Economics Papers here

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