Blogs&Reviews

  • Competition policy and European firms’ competitiveness

    Massimo Motta, Martin Peitz, 20 February 2019

    Massimo Motta and Martin Peitz ask whether merger control obstructs or promotes European firms’ competitiveness, whether there is room for public policy considerations beyond competition policy goals when dealing with competition-related issues, and what can be done to promote the competitiveness of European firms both within and beyond Europe.

  • A world with central bank digital currencies

    Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, Maria Soledad Martinez Peria, Itai Agur, Anil Ari, John Kiff, Adina Popescu, Céline Rochon, Zoltan Jakab, 15 February 2019

    In this post, a group of IMF economists examine why central banks might consider issuing digitial currency, and how households and firms might adapt.

  • In this post, Ashoka Mody documents the costs of ECB timidity, which, he argues, arises from the political limits on its actions.

  • Hard Brexit ahead: Breaking the deadlock and restarting customs cooperation in Europe

    Gabriel Felbermayr, Clemens Fuest, Hans Gersbach, Albrecht Ritschl, Marcel Thum, Martin Braml, 07 February 2019

    The authors of this post argue that while the deadlock in the Brexit negotiations can be broken by tweaking the time limits of the Withdrawal Agreement and at the same time abandoning the backstop, a more viable long-term solution is a European Customs Association where Britain has active membership and a full vote alongside the EU member states.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Roger Farmer, 13 June 2018

    In the New Keynesian model, the connection between the unemployment rate and the inflation rate is driven by the Phillips curve. In this post, Roger Farmer proposes replacing the Phillips curve with a belief function, an alternative theory of the connection between unemployment and inflation that better explains the facts.

  • Livio Stracca, 13 June 2018

    Knowledge of central banks is limited among households, who are also often found to have beliefs that are inconsistent with the foundations of the models underpinning modern monetary policy, such as the fact that higher interest rates lead to lower inflation. In this post, Livio Stracca describes the implications of this fact and summarises a new book that tries to popularise modern central banking for a wider audience.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 12 June 2018

    Not long after having said that the China trade war was “on hold”, the Trump administration flipped the switch back to “on”. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel analyses Trump’s actions and asks whether his approach to trade can be explained.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 12 June 2018

    In the wake of the ‘Windrush generation’ row, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that the 2010 UK coalition government’s focus on immigration with the ‘tens of thousands’ target was a deceit because most of the government had no intention of achieving that target. Part of the facade of trying to hit that target was the hostile environment policy.

  • Nikolaus Wolf, 11 June 2018

    With protectionism back on the political agenda, the European Review of Economic History has published a selection of papers demonstrating how trade and welfare policies have always been related. As Nikolaus Wolf discusses in this post, the papers also show that while the wider economic benefits from protectionism are uncertain at best, 100 years ago domestic policy considerations were already often trumping international cooperation.

Pages

Vox eBooks

CEPR Policy Research