Blogs&Reviews

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Diane Coyle, 10 July 2018

    In his new book, The Rise and Fall of the British Nation: A Twentieth Century History, David Edgerton argues that the key phenomenon of the post-WWII decades was not welfarism or corporatism but the creation of a distinctive British nation – until Mrs Thatcher started to turn the country back into an internationalist capitalist one. In this post, Diane Coyle finds that while the book makes for a refereshing read, not every bit of its myth-busting is wholly persuasive.   

  • Stephen Cecchetti, Kim Schoenholtz, 09 July 2018

    In this post, Stephen Cecchetti and Kermit Schoenholtz explain balance-of-payments crises – the sudden stops or capital flow reversals that compel countries to restore their external balance between exports and imports or, in the case of capital flight, shift to export surpluses. They also examine the Asian crisis of 1997-98 and the crisis in the euro area periphery from 2010 to 2012.

  • Jon Danielsson, Jia Rong Fan, 09 July 2018

    Julia, MATLAB, Python and R are among the most commonly used numerical programming languages by economic researchers. In this post, Jon Danielsson and Jia Rong Fan compare and contrast these four, reaching a very subjective conclusion as to which is best and which is worst.

  • Lant Pritchett, 06 July 2018

    When the upper bound of the impact of targeted interventions in developing countries is taken into consideration, the potential per person gains are dwarfed by the gains from labour mobility or extended growth episodes. In this post, Lant Pritchett argues that the fact that even small gains in the likelihood of producing a large positive (or avoiding a large negative) growth episode have massive expected value calls for more research into the topic.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 05 July 2018

    The EU have said that the deal offered to Northern Ireland (staying in the Single Market for goods without freedom of movement) is not available to the UK as a whole, a position that the UK has not tried to test in its negotiations. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that Theresa May should stop appeasing the Brexiters and formally make the proposal to the EU of extending the Northern Ireland deal to the rest of the UK.

Pages

CEPR Policy Research