Blogs&Reviews

  • Addressing global imbalances requires cooperation

    Maurice Obstfeld, 10 August 2018

    The IMF's 2018 External Sector Report assesses the current account balances for the 30 largest economies. In this post, Maurice Obstfeld outlines the key findings of the report.

  • Introducing a new Brexit policy panel

    Anand Menon, Jonathan Portes, 09 August 2018

    In this post, Anand Menon and Jonathan Portes summarise the results of the first in a monthly series of surveys in which a cross-disciplinary group of leading social scientists are asked their views on three key areas of uncertainty around Brexit: if — and when — the UK will leave the EU; how Brexit will affect British politics; and what our relationship with the EU is likely to look like in the future.

  • Our Gilded Age (India version)

    Diane Coyle, 08 August 2018

    Diane Coyle reviews James Crabtree’s "The Billionaire Raj", which offers a window on India’s super-wealthy and on on an extraordinary period of change in the country.

  • Red and Blue: One country or two?

    Helen Popper, 06 August 2018

    Republican and Democrat states, and their economies, differ. In this post, Helen Popper and David Parsley ask whether they are as different as economies from two distinct countries.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Antonio Fatás, 16 June 2018

    GDP growth rates can be a  misleading indicator of the true performance of different economies. In this post, Antonio Fatas argues that once the effect of an ageing population is removed, Japan has actually performed very well since 1990, while Italy stands out among the largest advanced economies because its performance along all dimensions has been poor since the 1990s.

  • Karl Whelan, 13 June 2018

    The past week has been the most fraught yet in the Brexit negotiations, with the ‘Irish backstop’ a key issue. In this post, Karl Whelan argues that rather than being threatened economically, Northern Ireland would gain from the implementation of the EU’s backstop.

  • Ashoka Mody, 14 June 2018

    Italian financial tremors are again rumbling dangerously. In this post, Ashoka Mody describes how tremors from the Italian fault line are set to spread in cascading earthquakes through euro area and global financial systems.

  • Roger Farmer, 13 June 2018

    In the New Keynesian model, the connection between the unemployment rate and the inflation rate is driven by the Phillips curve. In this post, Roger Farmer proposes replacing the Phillips curve with a belief function, an alternative theory of the connection between unemployment and inflation that better explains the facts.

  • Livio Stracca, 13 June 2018

    Knowledge of central banks is limited among households, who are also often found to have beliefs that are inconsistent with the foundations of the models underpinning modern monetary policy, such as the fact that higher interest rates lead to lower inflation. In this post, Livio Stracca describes the implications of this fact and summarises a new book that tries to popularise modern central banking for a wider audience.

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