Benjamin Bernard, Agostino Capponi, Joseph Stiglitz, 18 October 2017

Worried about the cost of public bailouts, governments have proposed bail-ins whereby banks contribute to rescuing their debtors. This column analyses the conditions under which bail-in strategies can be credibly implemented, showing that this heavily depends on the network structure. While earlier work has suggested that denser networks are socially preferred to more sparsely connected networks, the opposite holds in the presence of the government’s strategic intervention.

Michael Bordo, Pierre Siklos, 17 October 2017

The role of central banks in monetary policy and financial stability has changed radically over time. This examines the similarities and idiosyncrasies of ten central banks, and also considers how inflation might have looked had the central banks been around earlier, or had they adopted different strategies. While important differences between the narrative and statistical analyses of crises indicate that neither is sufficient on its own, small open economies appear to do comparatively well across the various crisis conditions, and inflation is almost always higher in the absence of an inflation target.

Sergei Guriev, Danny Leipziger, Jonathan D. Ostry, 16 October 2017

Globalisation and technological change present policymakers with tremendous challenges in sustaining benefits while containing the dislocations and polarisation that are plaguing many countries. This column argues that the answer is not to roll back these forces, but rather to redouble efforts to make globalisation genuinely inclusive. This involves thinking hard about the design and rules governing globalisation itself, including with respect to finance, but also with respect to trade. It also necessitates a recalibration of national economic policies that affect who benefits and who pays, and a host of complementary policies to mitigate exclusion and allow citizens to bounce back when dislocations occur.

Federica Liberini, Andrew Oswald, Eugenio Proto, Michela Redoano, 16 October 2017

There has been much debate on the determinants of the vote for Brexit. This column uses newly released data from the Understanding Society study to examine the characteristics of individuals who were for and against Brexit. Unhappiness contributed to the vote to leave the EU, but this was driven by feelings about individual financial situations rather than a general dissatisfaction with life. Brexit does not appear to have been caused by the old – only those under the age of 25 were substantially pro-Remain.  

Michel Serafinelli, 16 October 2017

The productivity benefits of similar firms locating near one another are well accepted, but there is little agreement on how knowledge spillovers have local effects. This column presents evidence from Italy of how firm-to-firm labour mobility enhances the productivity of firms located near other, highly productive firms. The main finding is that the recruitment of workers with experience at good firms significantly increases the productivity of the firms hiring them.

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